Liesje De Laet (1988, Belgium): Surrounded by sculptures of the world I see a multiplicity. With pointing at things, I try to reveal the potentialty they have. Whether it is about underlying relations between existing objects or about creating sculptures based on existhing artefacts, I want to achieve a more intense experience of things. In a literal way, there has to be worked with the work. Presentation in search for connections where the enivornement is a tool and the event a generator between audience and work. Borders are fading away. Settings are build and a strange duality in how to treat the work arises. Dance performances where the objects are becomming tools for a narratve story, settings created in public spaces where the passengers are part of the show or a private presentation on the dinning table where dinner is served next to or as part of the work…but still, it’s all about seeing the beauty of a detail and bring it in relations…

Sylvie De Meerleer (1986, Belgium): The three main keys in my work are pencil, exploration and an incredible endurance. The best manner to elucidate these concepts is by writing about my most recent project, “Repeat 1”.

“Repeat 1” is a project in which I explore the boundaries of the image. A photograph is built out of a collection registered information. The way these information units are arranged determines the possibility to recognize forms or symbols. I examine the consequences of making interventions In this information. These interventions influence the readability of the image. Depending on the type of intervention, the image becomes less or “different” readable.

The project is based on a picture of a woman. I repeat her infinitely in a series of drawings. Still, it’s never a pure repetition. It’s about the endless possibilities of an image. Like a maniac I research ways to de-, and reconstruct the image and how this affects the readability.

Arnaud De Wolf (1981, Belgium): In my lens-based work, I create a fictitious, parallel world. I filter out the ‘disturbing parameters’, ‘turbulence’ or ‘noise’ of contemporary, post-industrial society, rendering geographically ambiguous, alien places which contain a fragile equilibrium between nature and culture. I call them hibernating places. They generate a delusively peaceful universe that exudes Unheimlichkeit, solitariness, transitoriness and mortality on one hand as well as beauty, hope and a universal desire on the other hand.

Most of the pictures are made with a large-format camera. The compositions refer to popular landscape paintings, the style of the New Topography or (pure) documentary photography. Despite their seemingly objective, distant viewpoint, the images do not have a single documentary value. They are rather misguiding fragments. The photos gain an undefined character as references to specific locations are avoided while the titles don’t divulge more than what was already apparent at first reading.

 Sarah-Mace Dennis (1981, Australia): Sarah-Mace Dennis is an interdisciplinary artist whose practice investigates intersections between fiction, screen arts, installation, dance and performance. Her work, which she often performs in herself, explores cultural and social histories and concepts surrounding memory, perception and place. Following lines of thought where they have needed to take her, she has created video art and experimental films and made performances, hypermedia projects, public artworks and installations. The transformation of cultural, oral and personal histories into dynamic narrative spaces conceptually anchors much of her creative process. Using performance and storytelling devices to illustrate her ideas,embodied sensations are interwoven with personal histories, imagined stories, and an exploration of cultural events.

Nicolas Grenier (1982, Canada): My artworks, primarily paintings but also drawings, architectural installations and artist books, question the connections between the many systems we inhabit—political, economic, cultural and social—and the principles (or absence of principles) at the root of these systems. Using the language of architecture, urban planning and diagrams, I imagine absurd or perverse models that are not incongruous with the mechanisms by which organic elements are integrated into structured wholes: households, communities, countries, maps, policies. Such concerns may appear irreconcilable with the practice of painting. Is painting limited to self-referential lyricism and subjectivity alone, or can it also be used to propose a more analytical critique of societal and topical issues? I try to raise this fundamental question in my work by combining research and the use of many symbolic and indexical elements such as color coding, text, arrows and legends, which constantly refer to concepts and ideas outside the canvas, while their meaning within the work remains relative to colors and shapes. Some projects take the form of architectural installations; these are conceived as interactive ways to explore the concerns in my paintings at a human scale, such as the integration of public and private space, and how design affects social interactions and relations of power.

Liesbet Grupping (1984, Belgium): “stop counting on that camera that hangs round your neck. Because it won’t even remember what you choose to forget…”

…nevertheless, I have the will of a photographer. I want to capture, describe and articulate what surrounds me.

I enjoy techniques and their use and I love to challenge them. Through serendipity, I create. Through aleotoric methods of making and reading images, I rethink perceptions and experiences. Perhaps I see myself as a stage-manager who act with tangible and intangible actors, instruments, props and public.

Marie-Claire Krell (1983,The Netherlands): Changes always occur, have always occurred and will always occur. Change either occurs slowly or traumatic. Culture is the intersection of the values and traditions of the past with the desires and wishes for the future. In my artistic work I communicate this dynamic of the present to the public:
I confront the visitor with playful traumata.

The strength of my visual work is the fact that I combine different elements, such as reality and fiction, objects, people, time and space to one story, without giving any specific meaning to it. This creates the possibility for each observer to independently develop their own story starting from their very own reality, being inventor and part of it at the same time.

I do so by combining life-size sculptures to walk-through comics, in a way that a narrative coherence arises. The different elements give rise to associations about what took or will take place on the site.

Catriona Leahy (1981, Ireland): I examine time, duration & memory, both in a personal and wider social context, giving these inherently ambiguous, intangible and subjective phenomena a material and spatial context. Sites left in a state of abandonment or the ‘modern ruin’ often form a starting point. These sites, always in a state of flux, hovering between temporal zones, hold an eerie and compelling fascination for me. A palimpsest that speaks to us of temporality, these sites force us to humbly recognize that we are in fact the fragile ones, and that before us stands the element of permanence, the element of endurance.

Utilising the disparate material of paper, concrete and projected imagery I set up multi- dimensional installations signalling my interpretations of time and memory as tactile concepts. As the viewer navigates the work through space, they too become acutely aware of the passage of time and their involvement in activating its content.

Ulrik Lopez (1989, Mexico/US): My work is a constant exploration thru small gestures or big deeds, by the means of sculpture and drawing. I’m interested in constructing or capturing an experience, to then make it an infinite one. I enjoy the idea of constructing enigmas rather than providing answers or information. To do this I think my latest work tries to achieve this by utopian means. What I mean by this is that I think that my work must be utopian to prevail, and when I say utopian, I’m referring to the philosopher’s, Slavoj Zizek, definition: “true utopia is when the situation is so without issue, without a way to resolve it within the coordinates of the possible that out of the pure urge of survival you have to invent a new space. Utopia is not kind of a free imagination, utopia is a matter of inner-most urgency, you are forced to imagine it is the only way out ” In this sense my work intents to be utopian.

Maria McKinney (1982, Ireland): Focusing on the lacunal space within the structure of the globally familiar systems of distraction and tools of mass consumption, I consider the physicality of the chosen items as well as their habitual use or purpose. I then attempt to draw out or create an underlying significance through a predetermined process of intervention. Mine is a gesture to contemplate the ritual aspect of recreation through intervening on the material manifestation of these activities that are performed amid the day-to-day. The result is an engrossing enquiry into the resonances of boredom and how we choose to fill it with distraction and recreation.

Hsiang-Lu Meng (1982, Taiwan): I am fascinated with the relationship between the individual and the collective. The dynamics of how each of us, individually, fit into society and our environment.

In my exploration of the many facets of this concept, I use different materials as my medium. By employing the appropriate material, I believe that my ideas and thoughts can be more effectively communicated. Each medium, be it wood, clay, metal, glass, or photography carries a different connotation and has the potential to evoke different emotions. By using everyday objects, such as furniture, pencils, buttons and the like, I hope to draw the viewer in with a dose of familiarity. By altering these items and taking them out of their normal context, I hope to evoke the viewer to think much more broadly in terms of the general concept.

My art is both a statement as well as an examination of life in modern society. My hope is that it also challenges the individual to question where they fit and ponder where they actually belong.

Griet Moors (1980, Belgium): My more recent paintings highlight the search for the ‘right’ shapes, colours, directions, dynamics, contrasts, … . The origin of my images is mostly figurative (interiors and landscapes), but I handle my sources with a great sense of freedom in order to reach a certain level of abstraction that reorganizes the chaos in the original pictures. Planes and lines appear in addition to each other as the result of rapid, spontaneous decisions, taken in dialogue with the medium and the image that is generated.
Besides painting and depending on the most suitable way to express a certain content, the output of my artistic work can be a photograph or a sculpture just as well. Quite often a car is the main reappearing symbol in these type of works.

Jane Mi (1978, US): My work is concerned with the intersections and tensions between the specific and how it relates to the universal. I consider the ways that the boundaries and labels we create are constructed, projected, and enforced, exploring the systems which society uses to judge value – cultural, economic and social. I aim to highlight points of entry and connection between the self, the other, and the world-at-large, to raise queries that broaden the mind and ways of thinking. I search for that which we have in common.

Trained as an ocean engineer, I turned to art to explore and address the scope of human capacity and interaction. My work seeks to capture and express this experience of humanistic recognition while honoring aesthetic traditions rooted in different cultures. To bring our interconnectedness to the front and center, our relationships to and with each other, as well as the world we live in.

Kevin Nieuwenhuijs (1986, The Netherlands): In my works I explore contrasting themes like life and death, authority and identity, destruction and rebuilding, freedom and containment.
My works mainly consists of lifelike charcoal drawings which I tear apart after completion and then reconstruct, crumple or merge as a collage. The reconstruction and merging of these drawings is done with needle and thread.

Felix Nybergh (1985, Finland): In my work I trace the repetitive nature of the photographic image by looking for repetition in everyday life. With a detached documentary approach, I aim to reverse the relation between image and life in order to question the location of the referent: The work consists of portraits, photographs of portraits, photos of images, photos that use other photos as their source etc. What interests me is the complex relation we have with the referent. i.e the source, the real.

The inherent contradiction to photography, the fact that it cannot exist without repetition and at the same time is considered mimetic to the “real”, is what inspires me to use the medium as a tool for exploring reality. Repetition is also to be found at the base of all kinds of learning, evolution and progress. More than forming our way of seeing and being, repetition is our way of being; we can only (re)act if we can relate.

My work is about the struggle of balancing on the fine line that divides natural, “necessary”, repetition from the blind repetitiveness that characterizes so much of human social behavior.

Rashanna Rashied-Walker (1980, US): A journey is more than its endpoint; the final destination is merely an aside. The space in between is of interest. An unfixed moment, a fleeting image or chance encounter along the way allows space for the interconnectedness between art and life to surface. Walking ultimately leads to discoveries. Peripatetic inquires provide a fuelled response to the physical landscape in the present moment, a sustained balance of hope and truth within uncertainty.

There is an intrinsic commitment to and reverence for the land. Working ultimately to change how we view and interact with our environment, walking, observing and directly experiencing nature sparks a desire to capture, highlight, and interpret the extraordinary phenomena within our surroundings. Interference with nature pronounced or slight by way of interventions, installations involving image and sound, text, photography, printed matter and physical transgressions allow me to activate and archive transitory moments in time.

Eva Spierenburg (1987, Dutch): In my work, I explore the role of identity and self-awareness of the human being, within a complex, ever changing world. It is about the individual who is struggling with his identity, or about the individual who is unwilling or incapable of accepting reality. These beings take their shape within archetypical scenes, where I blend my own recollections and dreams with existing narrations and symbolism. The narrations I use range from ancient myths from all over the world, to writings from Sartre or Jung.

The use of different materials plays an important role in my work. Beside paint, my paintings consist among others of tar, sealant, drawing-pins and paraffin. The choice for a particular material is motivated by characteristics like colour, tactility, smell and symbolism.

Ben Vandenberghe (1985, Belgian): The artistic practice that Ben Van den Berghe has developed over the last few years originates from a strong interest in the ways individuals and society at large give meaning and structure to life through psychology, politics, religion, traditions… In his recent work — which consists of photo’s, video’s and (manuals for) performances — he has focused on, for example, the symbolic potential of individual assaults on powerful figures, the power games behind seemingly innocent handshakes, and the contagiousness of laughter.

Using photography as an important point of reference, the artist takes a critical stance within a documentary tradition. But photography is perhaps more a state of mind for the artist than it is his prefered medium: it is a way of keeping the day-to-day reality outside contemporary art close, but also of consciously selecting what is important, of choosing what is worth to see and show. This entails that, for Van den Berghe, being an artist does not only involve producing images, but also selecting and shaping them into exhibitions, and more broadly, an ever evolving body of work. It also means that there is a thin line between creating and curating. Having initiated several collaborative projects and co- curated photography festivals in Antwerp and Amsterdam, his collaborations could be considered an essential part of his own work. Together, his disparate, research-based projects form an encyclopedic and archival practice that deals with both the aesthetics and ethics of making artistic decisions and finding systems that generate meaning.

Javier Velazquez (1990, Spanish): I am interested in interpersonal relationships and how we are affected by the socio-historical and political surrounding us.

I try to come to know our socialization skills and to comtemplate their origins and how these are media- ted, influenced or manipulated. I create situations where different media or individuals get in an conflict of interest. This arises in a context which I mean, let’s call it, “battlefield” where resolved and implemented the game that exists in the negotiation, in an attempt to resolve this tension created, going on and being able to be seen like a show in

someway.There are other relationships that interest me and help to créate these tensions games such as the going from public to private, from the collective to the individual or from reality to fiction and vice versa.These concepts are usually formalized in performances, videos and installations.

Morgane Vie (1989, French): All my work is related to photography. I try to question the way of showing photography, how to present it in a more performativ way, in wich the viewer is not only watching a frame on a wall. The physicall and emotional relation that can be experienced by simple movement, as to turn the pages of a photo album, or to follow someone telling stories while showing images interest me a lot. The idea of “taking people away” is dominating my work, through the idea of travel disconnected from exotism, or moving into the exhibition space while the things are themselves changing, pushing people to make their own images by reading description of photographies.

Also I try to give room to people’s own creativity, by being light in what I propose, being light about the objects, to be stronger about the ideas.

Colin Waeghe (1980, Belgian): My work deals with reality – high and low. It is based on the idea that everything is in constant transformation. It tries to make the chemical abstraction concrete, and the subjective figuration abstract. It deals with religion in the true meaning of the word: connection. It is inspired by reality in all it’s forms: literature, music, cinematography, photography, theatre, science, philosophy, politics and art. But most of all it finds it’s origins in my day to day life and observations. It deals with the past, the present and the future. It makes no difference between the so called imaginative and the real. It deals with everything now.Liesje De Laet (1988, Belgium): Surrounded by sculptures of the world I see a multiplicity. With pointing at things, I try to reveal the potentialty they have. Whether it is about underlying relations between existing objects or about creating sculptures based on existhing artefacts, I want to achieve a more intense experience of things. In a literal way, there has to be worked with the work. Presentation in search for connections where the enivornement is a tool and the event a generator between audience and work. Borders are fading away. Settings are build and a strange duality in how to treat the work arises. Dance performances where the objects are becomming tools for a narratve story, settings created in public spaces where the passengers are part of the show or a private presentation on the dinning table where dinner is served next to or as part of the work…but still, it’s all about seeing the beauty of a detail and bring it in relations…

Sylvie De Meerleer (1986, Belgium): The three main keys in my work are pencil, exploration and an incredible endurance. The best manner to elucidate these concepts is by writing about my most recent project, “Repeat 1”.

“Repeat 1” is a project in which I explore the boundaries of the image. A photograph is built out of a collection registered information. The way these information units are arranged determines the possibility to recognize forms or symbols. I examine the consequences of making interventions In this information. These interventions influence the readability of the image. Depending on the type of intervention, the image becomes less or “different” readable.

The project is based on a picture of a woman. I repeat her infinitely in a series of drawings. Still, it’s never a pure repetition. It’s about the endless possibilities of an image. Like a maniac I research ways to de-, and reconstruct the image and how this affects the readability.

Arnaud De Wolf (1981, Belgium): In my lens-based work, I create a fictitious, parallel world. I filter out the ‘disturbing parameters’, ‘turbulence’ or ‘noise’ of contemporary, post-industrial society, rendering geographically ambiguous, alien places which contain a fragile equilibrium between nature and culture. I call them hibernating places. They generate a delusively peaceful universe that exudes Unheimlichkeit, solitariness, transitoriness and mortality on one hand as well as beauty, hope and a universal desire on the other hand.

Most of the pictures are made with a large-format camera. The compositions refer to popular landscape paintings, the style of the New Topography or (pure) documentary photography. Despite their seemingly objective, distant viewpoint, the images do not have a single documentary value. They are rather misguiding fragments. The photos gain an undefined character as references to specific locations are avoided while the titles don’t divulge more than what was already apparent at first reading.

 Sarah-Mace Dennis (1981, Australia): Sarah-Mace Dennis is an interdisciplinary artist whose practice investigates intersections between fiction, screen arts, installation, dance and performance. Her work, which she often performs in herself, explores cultural and social histories and concepts surrounding memory, perception and place. Following lines of thought where they have needed to take her, she has created video art and experimental films and made performances, hypermedia projects, public artworks and installations. The transformation of cultural, oral and personal histories into dynamic narrative spaces conceptually anchors much of her creative process. Using performance and storytelling devices to illustrate her ideas,embodied sensations are interwoven with personal histories, imagined stories, and an exploration of cultural events.

Nicolas Grenier (1982, Canada): My artworks, primarily paintings but also drawings, architectural installations and artist books, question the connections between the many systems we inhabit—political, economic, cultural and social—and the principles (or absence of principles) at the root of these systems. Using the language of architecture, urban planning and diagrams, I imagine absurd or perverse models that are not incongruous with the mechanisms by which organic elements are integrated into structured wholes: households, communities, countries, maps, policies. Such concerns may appear irreconcilable with the practice of painting. Is painting limited to self-referential lyricism and subjectivity alone, or can it also be used to propose a more analytical critique of societal and topical issues? I try to raise this fundamental question in my work by combining research and the use of many symbolic and indexical elements such as color coding, text, arrows and legends, which constantly refer to concepts and ideas outside the canvas, while their meaning within the work remains relative to colors and shapes. Some projects take the form of architectural installations; these are conceived as interactive ways to explore the concerns in my paintings at a human scale, such as the integration of public and private space, and how design affects social interactions and relations of power.

Liesbet Grupping (1984, Belgium): “stop counting on that camera that hangs round your neck. Because it won’t even remember what you choose to forget…”

…nevertheless, I have the will of a photographer. I want to capture, describe and articulate what surrounds me.

I enjoy techniques and their use and I love to challenge them. Through serendipity, I create. Through aleotoric methods of making and reading images, I rethink perceptions and experiences. Perhaps I see myself as a stage-manager who act with tangible and intangible actors, instruments, props and public.

Marie-Claire Krell (1983,The Netherlands): Changes always occur, have always occurred and will always occur. Change either occurs slowly or traumatic. Culture is the intersection of the values and traditions of the past with the desires and wishes for the future. In my artistic work I communicate this dynamic of the present to the public:
I confront the visitor with playful traumata.

The strength of my visual work is the fact that I combine different elements, such as reality and fiction, objects, people, time and space to one story, without giving any specific meaning to it. This creates the possibility for each observer to independently develop their own story starting from their very own reality, being inventor and part of it at the same time.

I do so by combining life-size sculptures to walk-through comics, in a way that a narrative coherence arises. The different elements give rise to associations about what took or will take place on the site.

Catriona Leahy (1981, Ireland): I examine time, duration & memory, both in a personal and wider social context, giving these inherently ambiguous, intangible and subjective phenomena a material and spatial context. Sites left in a state of abandonment or the ‘modern ruin’ often form a starting point. These sites, always in a state of flux, hovering between temporal zones, hold an eerie and compelling fascination for me. A palimpsest that speaks to us of temporality, these sites force us to humbly recognize that we are in fact the fragile ones, and that before us stands the element of permanence, the element of endurance.

Utilising the disparate material of paper, concrete and projected imagery I set up multi- dimensional installations signalling my interpretations of time and memory as tactile concepts. As the viewer navigates the work through space, they too become acutely aware of the passage of time and their involvement in activating its content.

Ulrik Lopez (1989, Mexico/US): My work is a constant exploration thru small gestures or big deeds, by the means of sculpture and drawing. I’m interested in constructing or capturing an experience, to then make it an infinite one. I enjoy the idea of constructing enigmas rather than providing answers or information. To do this I think my latest work tries to achieve this by utopian means. What I mean by this is that I think that my work must be utopian to prevail, and when I say utopian, I’m referring to the philosopher’s, Slavoj Zizek, definition: “true utopia is when the situation is so without issue, without a way to resolve it within the coordinates of the possible that out of the pure urge of survival you have to invent a new space. Utopia is not kind of a free imagination, utopia is a matter of inner-most urgency, you are forced to imagine it is the only way out ” In this sense my work intents to be utopian.

Maria McKinney (1982, Ireland): Focusing on the lacunal space within the structure of the globally familiar systems of distraction and tools of mass consumption, I consider the physicality of the chosen items as well as their habitual use or purpose. I then attempt to draw out or create an underlying significance through a predetermined process of intervention. Mine is a gesture to contemplate the ritual aspect of recreation through intervening on the material manifestation of these activities that are performed amid the day-to-day. The result is an engrossing enquiry into the resonances of boredom and how we choose to fill it with distraction and recreation.

Hsiang-Lu Meng (1982, Taiwan): I am fascinated with the relationship between the individual and the collective. The dynamics of how each of us, individually, fit into society and our environment.

In my exploration of the many facets of this concept, I use different materials as my medium. By employing the appropriate material, I believe that my ideas and thoughts can be more effectively communicated. Each medium, be it wood, clay, metal, glass, or photography carries a different connotation and has the potential to evoke different emotions. By using everyday objects, such as furniture, pencils, buttons and the like, I hope to draw the viewer in with a dose of familiarity. By altering these items and taking them out of their normal context, I hope to evoke the viewer to think much more broadly in terms of the general concept.

My art is both a statement as well as an examination of life in modern society. My hope is that it also challenges the individual to question where they fit and ponder where they actually belong.

Griet Moors (1980, Belgium): My more recent paintings highlight the search for the ‘right’ shapes, colours, directions, dynamics, contrasts, … . The origin of my images is mostly figurative (interiors and landscapes), but I handle my sources with a great sense of freedom in order to reach a certain level of abstraction that reorganizes the chaos in the original pictures. Planes and lines appear in addition to each other as the result of rapid, spontaneous decisions, taken in dialogue with the medium and the image that is generated.
Besides painting and depending on the most suitable way to express a certain content, the output of my artistic work can be a photograph or a sculpture just as well. Quite often a car is the main reappearing symbol in these type of works.

Jane Mi (1978, US): My work is concerned with the intersections and tensions between the specific and how it relates to the universal. I consider the ways that the boundaries and labels we create are constructed, projected, and enforced, exploring the systems which society uses to judge value – cultural, economic and social. I aim to highlight points of entry and connection between the self, the other, and the world-at-large, to raise queries that broaden the mind and ways of thinking. I search for that which we have in common.

Trained as an ocean engineer, I turned to art to explore and address the scope of human capacity and interaction. My work seeks to capture and express this experience of humanistic recognition while honoring aesthetic traditions rooted in different cultures. To bring our interconnectedness to the front and center, our relationships to and with each other, as well as the world we live in.

Kevin Nieuwenhuijs (1986, The Netherlands): In my works I explore contrasting themes like life and death, authority and identity, destruction and rebuilding, freedom and containment.
My works mainly consists of lifelike charcoal drawings which I tear apart after completion and then reconstruct, crumple or merge as a collage. The reconstruction and merging of these drawings is done with needle and thread.

Felix Nybergh (1985, Finland): In my work I trace the repetitive nature of the photographic image by looking for repetition in everyday life. With a detached documentary approach, I aim to reverse the relation between image and life in order to question the location of the referent: The work consists of portraits, photographs of portraits, photos of images, photos that use other photos as their source etc. What interests me is the complex relation we have with the referent. i.e the source, the real.

The inherent contradiction to photography, the fact that it cannot exist without repetition and at the same time is considered mimetic to the “real”, is what inspires me to use the medium as a tool for exploring reality. Repetition is also to be found at the base of all kinds of learning, evolution and progress. More than forming our way of seeing and being, repetition is our way of being; we can only (re)act if we can relate.

My work is about the struggle of balancing on the fine line that divides natural, “necessary”, repetition from the blind repetitiveness that characterizes so much of human social behavior.

Rashanna Rashied-Walker (1980, US): A journey is more than its endpoint; the final destination is merely an aside. The space in between is of interest. An unfixed moment, a fleeting image or chance encounter along the way allows space for the interconnectedness between art and life to surface. Walking ultimately leads to discoveries. Peripatetic inquires provide a fuelled response to the physical landscape in the present moment, a sustained balance of hope and truth within uncertainty.

There is an intrinsic commitment to and reverence for the land. Working ultimately to change how we view and interact with our environment, walking, observing and directly experiencing nature sparks a desire to capture, highlight, and interpret the extraordinary phenomena within our surroundings. Interference with nature pronounced or slight by way of interventions, installations involving image and sound, text, photography, printed matter and physical transgressions allow me to activate and archive transitory moments in time.

Eva Spierenburg (1987, Dutch): In my work, I explore the role of identity and self-awareness of the human being, within a complex, ever changing world. It is about the individual who is struggling with his identity, or about the individual who is unwilling or incapable of accepting reality. These beings take their shape within archetypical scenes, where I blend my own recollections and dreams with existing narrations and symbolism. The narrations I use range from ancient myths from all over the world, to writings from Sartre or Jung.

The use of different materials plays an important role in my work. Beside paint, my paintings consist among others of tar, sealant, drawing-pins and paraffin. The choice for a particular material is motivated by characteristics like colour, tactility, smell and symbolism.

Ben Vandenberghe (1985, Belgian): The artistic practice that Ben Van den Berghe has developed over the last few years originates from a strong interest in the ways individuals and society at large give meaning and structure to life through psychology, politics, religion, traditions… In his recent work — which consists of photo’s, video’s and (manuals for) performances — he has focused on, for example, the symbolic potential of individual assaults on powerful figures, the power games behind seemingly innocent handshakes, and the contagiousness of laughter.

Using photography as an important point of reference, the artist takes a critical stance within a documentary tradition. But photography is perhaps more a state of mind for the artist than it is his prefered medium: it is a way of keeping the day-to-day reality outside contemporary art close, but also of consciously selecting what is important, of choosing what is worth to see and show. This entails that, for Van den Berghe, being an artist does not only involve producing images, but also selecting and shaping them into exhibitions, and more broadly, an ever evolving body of work. It also means that there is a thin line between creating and curating. Having initiated several collaborative projects and co- curated photography festivals in Antwerp and Amsterdam, his collaborations could be considered an essential part of his own work. Together, his disparate, research-based projects form an encyclopedic and archival practice that deals with both the aesthetics and ethics of making artistic decisions and finding systems that generate meaning.

Javier Velazquez (1990, Spanish): I am interested in interpersonal relationships and how we are affected by the socio-historical and political surrounding us.

I try to come to know our socialization skills and to comtemplate their origins and how these are media- ted, influenced or manipulated. I create situations where different media or individuals get in an conflict of interest. This arises in a context which I mean, let’s call it, “battlefield” where resolved and implemented the game that exists in the negotiation, in an attempt to resolve this tension created, going on and being able to be seen like a show in

someway.There are other relationships that interest me and help to créate these tensions games such as the going from public to private, from the collective to the individual or from reality to fiction and vice versa.These concepts are usually formalized in performances, videos and installations.

Morgane Vie (1989, French): All my work is related to photography. I try to question the way of showing photography, how to present it in a more performativ way, in wich the viewer is not only watching a frame on a wall. The physicall and emotional relation that can be experienced by simple movement, as to turn the pages of a photo album, or to follow someone telling stories while showing images interest me a lot. The idea of “taking people away” is dominating my work, through the idea of travel disconnected from exotism, or moving into the exhibition space while the things are themselves changing, pushing people to make their own images by reading description of photographies.

Also I try to give room to people’s own creativity, by being light in what I propose, being light about the objects, to be stronger about the ideas.

Colin Waeghe (1980, Belgian): My work deals with reality – high and low. It is based on the idea that everything is in constant transformation. It tries to make the chemical abstraction concrete, and the subjective figuration abstract. It deals with religion in the true meaning of the word: connection. It is inspired by reality in all it’s forms: literature, music, cinematography, photography, theatre, science, philosophy, politics and art. But most of all it finds it’s origins in my day to day life and observations. It deals with the past, the present and the future. It makes no difference between the so called imaginative and the real. It deals with everything now.